Kelpie

Kelpie

You may have heard of the Kelpie, a shape-shifting water horse that lives in Scotland that usually inhabits the lochs and pools in the country. It is usually described as appearing as a beautiful black horse, but can also look like a human. There are some accounts that they still keep their hooves (which have been mentioned that they are reversed compared to regular horses) which leads them to be associated with the Devil. Almost every body of water in Scotland has a Kelpie story. The origin in the belief of these malevolent water horses has been thought to have started in human sacrifices once made to appease water gods. However, narratives about the Kelpie also served as a practical use in keeping children away from dangerous waters and warning young women to stay away from handsome strangers. Douglas Harper, a historian and founder of the Online Etymology Dictionary, defines Kelpie as “the Lowland name of a demon in the shape of a horse”.

It is considered one of the most common water spirits in Scottish folklore, but the name is attributed to a few different forms in narratives recorded throughout the country. In the late 19th century there was an onset of interest in transcribing folklore, but the records are inconsistent in spelling and frequently anglicized words which could result in differing names for the same spirit.

People have been rumored to capture kelpies using a halter stamped with a cross and harnessing its incredible strength to pull and transport heavy mill stones. It can also be killed with a silver bullet like a werewolf.

Now a new part that I will be adding to my posts will be my own opinion of the topic at hand. I believe that kelpies are a beautiful part of Scottish history. I do believe in many things and am always optimistic to possible beings that are living among us and the kelpie is such an interesting creature that I’d love to see it be real. I believe strongly that anything is really possible, and a kelpie just might be possible.

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