Chupacabra

FeaturedChupacabra

The Chupacabra is a legendary creature and possible cryptid that has been spoken about for many years in Puerto Rico, Mexico, and the Americas. Its name is translated literally into “goat-sucker” because of how it kills and drains the blood from animals. There are various descriptions of the Chupacabra, some say it’s heavy and the size of a small bear. Others have said that it is a reptile-like creature with leathery or scaly greenish-gray skin and sharp spines or quills running down its back and is about three to four feet tall. Also that it can hop like a kangaroo. Another description is that it is a strange hairless breed of dog with a pronounced spinal ridge, pronounced eye sockets, fangs, and claws. There have been sightings since 1995 in Puerto Rico and are still being spotted today. Many biologists and wildlife management officials believe the Chupacabra is merely an urban legend.

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Kelpie

FeaturedKelpie

You may have heard of the Kelpie, a shape-shifting water horse that lives in Scotland that usually inhabits the lochs and pools in the country. It is usually described as appearing as a beautiful black horse, but can also look like a human. There are some accounts that they still keep their hooves (which have been mentioned that they are reversed compared to regular horses) which leads them to be associated with the Devil. Almost every body of water in Scotland has a Kelpie story. The origin in the belief of these malevolent water horses has been thought to have started in human sacrifices once made to appease water gods. However, narratives about the Kelpie also served as a practical use in keeping children away from dangerous waters and warning young women to stay away from handsome strangers. Douglas Harper, a historian and founder of the Online Etymology Dictionary, defines Kelpie as “the Lowland name of a demon in the shape of a horse”.

It is considered one of the most common water spirits in Scottish folklore, but the name is attributed to a few different forms in narratives recorded throughout the country. In the late 19th century there was an onset of interest in transcribing folklore, but the records are inconsistent in spelling and frequently anglicized words which could result in differing names for the same spirit.

People have been rumored to capture kelpies using a halter stamped with a cross and harnessing its incredible strength to pull and transport heavy mill stones. It can also be killed with a silver bullet like a werewolf.

Now a new part that I will be adding to my posts will be my own opinion of the topic at hand. I believe that kelpies are a beautiful part of Scottish history. I do believe in many things and am always optimistic to possible beings that are living among us and the kelpie is such an interesting creature that I’d love to see it be real. I believe strongly that anything is really possible, and a kelpie just might be possible.

Zaratan

FeaturedZaratan

The Zaratan is a giant sea turtle (sometimes an octopus or a whale) that is described in folklore and literature that has a large shell that resembles a sloped rocky mound that is supposedly several hundred feet in diameter. Sailors who came across it always mistook it for a small island and they would anchor on it for the night, but as nighttime approached the turtle would swim down into the water which unfortunately drowned the sailors. The Zaratan has also been described as being a giant fish that tries to bring its tail to its mouth but can’t due to its massive size. When a Zaratan gets hungry it is said to open its mouth extremely wide and release a sweet smell and when the fish come near it snaps its jaws shut in a similar fashion to an alligator snapping turtle. The Zaratan has been depicted as a whale in “Sinbad the Sailor” and is also believed to be the same as the Aspidochelone or the Kraken. It’s also believed that the original city of Atlantis was on top of the turtle and that when the turtle dove it destroyed the city and that’s what happened to it. The most similar type of folklore creature would be the turtle that holds the world on its back from many origins of the world stories.

Lizard Men

FeaturedLizard Men

The Lizard Man, or Lizard Men, are not a specific type of cryptid, but the term is used instead to describe a broad spectrum of bipedal hominid-like reptilian people. There are many sightings all over the world. Some examples would be the intulo of South Africa, the Cherufe Lizard Man of South America, the New Jersey Gator Man, Loveland Frogman of Ohio, Lizard Man of Scape Ore Swamp, Canadian Lizard Man, Nagas of India, Kappas of Japan, and the Lizard Demon in Wood County, West Virginia. There have been many theories as to how these Lizard people came to existence. Some theories suggest that they are living dinosaurs, a form of evolution in which a reptile hierarchy continued to evolve along the same path as the early primates. Other theories suggest that they are reptilian aliens, and that many UFO and alien abduction cases have made notes of the fact that people have claimed that the aliens were reptilian-like. There are many other theories to why these reptile-people are coming to our planet and living among us,  but with so many reports of these being living amongst us you have a reptile person right beside you.

Ebu Gogo

FeaturedEbu Gogo

The Ebu Gogo are a group of humanoid creatures that first appeared in Flores mythology. In the Nage language of central Flores “ebu” means ‘grandmother’ and “gogo” means ‘he who eats anything’. The Nage people of Flores, Indonesia have described the Ebu Gogo as having the ability to walk and run quite quickly at around the height of 1.5 meters (about four to almost five feet tall) and they have flat and wide noses, broad faces with large mouths and extremely hairy bodies. They reportedly murmur in what seems to be their own language and also could repeat what others said to them in a parrot-like fashion. The legends of the Ebu Gogo were attributed to monkeys, but at the time they were believed to be a type of human. During the time of the Portuguese Trading Ship arriving in the 17th century people believed that they were alive during this time. They also think that they were alive up until the 20th century, but are no longer in existence. It would have seemed they were hunted to extinction. Stories say that they used to steal food from human camps and kidnap children, so the people in those camps offered them a gift of palm fiber to make into clothing. They accepted the gift and took it back to their cave to start making clothing. The people then threw a firebrand into the cave and set it on fire. It killed all of the Ebu Gogo except possibly one pair that managed to escape to a nearby forest where they may supposedly be living today.

Akkorokamui

FeaturedAkkorokamui

The Akkorokamui (or also known as the Ashketanne Mat which means “Long-fingered Woman) is a half-human half-octopus monster from the Ainu and Shinto folklore in Japan. It supposedly lurks in the Funka Bay in Hokkaido. It’s also been sighted in several other locations such as Taiwan and Korea for centuries.

According to the Shinto mythology, the creature is human-like and has a bright red color. John Batchelor wrote in his book “The Ainu and Their Folklore” he states that the creature is 120 meters (about 394 feet) in length and its color was “liken to the color of the reflection of the setting sun upon water”. It also has the ability to self-amputate like an octopus and regenerate limbs like one as well. This characteristic manifested itself in the belief in Shinto that Akkorokamui has healing powers. As a result of that belief among followers believe that giving offerings to Akkorokamui will heal ailments of the body, mainly those that are disfigured or have broken limbs.

The legend of how this creature became starts a long time ago in that spirits cursed a person named Rebunge who was a villager of Abuta Toyoura to see the destruction of his own village. They sent a half-spider half-human monster called Yaoshikepu to fulfill this curse. Yaoshikepu set out to destroy the village and slaughtered so many people that the streets were filled with blood. After hearing the townsfolk trembling and screaming with fear the sea kami (“kami” means divine beast in the Shinto religion) Repunkamui transformed Yaoshikepu into an octopus and sent her into the sea. After she was sent into the sea she began to grow and was consuming larger prey such as whales and attacking ships. One day Akkorokamui ate a boat full of fishermen and once in her stomach, the fishermen called out for help. After hearing these cries, Repunkamui poised Akkorokamui and caused her great pain. As she yelled in pain the fishermen managed to escaped. Akkorokamui learned how to harness the poison, however, and used it to attack her prey, including more ships with fishermen in them.

The Ainu reverence of Akkorokamui has become a permanent part of Shintoism which incorporated it as a minor kami. The self purification practices for this kami are strictly followed. One’s hands must be cleaned with water, with the exception that one’s feet must also be cleaned. While it is often presented as a benevolent kami with powers to heal and bestow knowledge it is also capable of doing harm. Also because of the nature of it being part octopus it means that it is persistent and it’s nearly impossible to escape its grasp without permission. Akkorokamui enjoys the sea and so the offerings that are the best would be fish, crab and mollusks. There are shrines dedicated with Akkorokamui and associated octopus deity which can be found throughout Japan. The most well known shrines are found in Kyoto and the island of Hokkaido.

This beautiful yet dangerous mythological creature is somewhat a cryptid in its sightings. Many would argue it is just visions of those who strongly believe in a higher power and that it is not a cryptid at all. I like to believe that there is always some truth in these types of stories. Who are we to say it isn’t so?

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Yowie

The name of the Yowie one of several names that are given to the hominid that lives in Australia. The creature originated in the Aboriginal oral history. In parts of Queensland they are referred to as “Quinkin” or a type of quinkin and as a joogabinna. In New South Wales, it’s known by a plethora of names: jurrawarra, myngawin, puttikan, gubba, doolaga, gulaga, thoolagal, yahoo, yaroma, noocoonah, wawee, pangkarlangu, jimbra and tjangara. Many people belive that the existence of the Yowie is a mix of misidentification, folklore, and a hoaxes. Yowie-type creatures are quite common in Aboriginal legends, more particularly in the eastern Australian states.

The Yowie is typically described as hairy and ape-like standing upright between 6 ft 11 in and 12 ft. As with most large hominids that are reported the Yowie’s feet are reported to be much larger than human feet but so far tracks have shown inconsistencies in shape and toe number, and even witness don’t have similar descriptions of the beast. The one thing that is consistent is that the nose is wide and flat. It’s behavior has been reported as either timid or shy, or violent and aggressive. There is no set way of describing the Yowie, just like how there is no set way in knowing if it’s actually being sighted or not. Mysterious, no?