Jesse Pomeroy

FeaturedJesse Pomeroy

Jesse Harding Pomeroy was born in Charlestown, Massachusetts to Thomas J. Pomeroy and Ruth Ann Snowman. He was the second child, with his brother being two years older than him. Thomas Pomeroy was a verteran of the U.S. Civil War.

In the period between 1971-1972 there were reports that several young boys were being each inticed to remote areas and being attacked by a slightly older boy. No one was arrested, however, the attacks were noteworthy because of the extreme brutality that was used by the assailant. The boys were beaten with a fist and a belt, and in at lest two of the attacks a knife was used. Some of the boys were physically scarred permanently.

In 1872, Ruth and her two children moved to South Boston. Pomeroy’s attacks on the boys continued and he was finally arrested and his case was heard in front of a Juvenile Court judge. He was found guilty and sentenced to the State Reform School for Boys at Westborough due to his age.

In February of 1874 when Pomeroy was 14, he was paroled back to this mother in South Boston. In March of that same year, a ten-year-old girl from South Boston went missing. Her name was Katie Curran. On April 22nd, 1874 the badly mutilated body of a four-year-old boy named Horace Millen was found on the marsh area of Dorchester Bay. As soon as they found this discovery the police went looking for Pomeroy despite a lack of evidence against him. The body of Katie Curran was found in the basement of Pomeroy’s mother’s dress shop.

Pomeroy was taken to view Millen’s body and was questioned if he committed the murder. He was denied the right to counsel. On December 9th and 10th of 1874, he was put on trial. Pomeroy was found guilty on December 10th, 1874. The jury recommended mercy on the boy because of his age. Pomeroy’s attorney filed two exceptions which were both overruled in February of 1875 at which point Pomeroy was sentenced to death by hanging. It was the Governor’s job to sign the death warrant, but he refused to. The only legal way to spare Pomeroy’s life was to go through the Massachusetts Governor’s Council and there had to be a majority vote to commute the death penalty. Over the next two and a half years the Council voted three times. Twice they chose to go with the death penalty, and the Governor refused both those times as well. In August of 1876, Pomeroy’s sentence was commuted to life in prison in solitary confinement. On September 7th, 1876 Pomeroy was moved to the State Prison located in Charlestown. He was 16-years-old. He made 10 or 12 attempts to escape but was unsuccessful. On September 29th, 1932 he died at the Bridgewater Hospital for the Criminally Insane.

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Brenda Spencer

FeaturedBrenda Spencer

Brenda Spencer was born on April 3rd, 1962 in San Diego, California (the San Carlos neighborhood) to Wallace and Dot Spencer. She lived in a house that was located across the street from the Grover Cleveland Elementary School in the San Diego Unified School District. When her parents separated, she lived with her father in poverty. They slept on the floor on a single mattress with empty alcohol bottles throughout the house.

Acquaintances spoke of Spencer as having expressed hostility toward policemen, even talked about shooting one, and talked about doing something big to get on TV. Although she showed exceptional skill in photography, she was extremely uninterested in school. Later when she was in custody it was discovered she had damage to the temporal lobe of her brain, which was attributed to a bicycle accident.

In early 1978, the staff at a facility for problem youth (where Spencer was referred to for truancy,) informed her family that she was suicidal. During that summer, she was arrested for shooting out of the windows of Cleveland Elementary with a BB gun, as well as charged with burglary. In December, a psychiatric evaluation that was arranged by her probation officer recommended that she be admitted to a mental hospital for depression, but her father refused to give permission to do so. On Christmas that year her father gave her a Ruger 10/22 semi-automatic .22 caliber rifle with a scope and 500 rounds of ammunition. Spencer said later “I felt like he wanted me to kill myself” in regards to the gun.

On the morning of January 29th, 1979, Spencer began shooting from her home at children who were waiting outside Cleveland Elementary School for the principal, Burton Wragg, to open the gates. She injured eight children and killed Wragg, who was trying to protect the children. Custodian Mike Suchar was also killed trying to pull a student to safety. A police officer responding to a call for assistance was wounded in the neck when he arrived. After firing 30 rounds of ammunition, Spencer barricaded herself inside her house for several hours. She had a phone call with a journalist from The San Diego Union-Tribune, who reported that she said “I don’t like Mondays. This livens up the day” in response to why she committed the shooting. She also spoke with police negotiators and telling them she would come out shooting. She eventually surrendered. Police found beer and whiskey bottles around the house but Spencer herself didn’t seem intoxicated.

Spencer was tried as an adult and pleaded guilty to two counts of murder and assault with a deadly weapon. She was sentenced to 25 years to life in prison. While in prison she was diagnosed with epilepsy and received medication to treat epilepsy and depression.

Spencer has had four unsuccessful parole hearings as of December of 2015. As of June of 2017 she remains in prison at the California Institution for Women in Chino, California.

Wayne Williams

FeaturedWayne Williams

Wayne Bertram Williams was born on May 27th, 1958 and was raised in the Dixie Hills neighborhood of southwest Atlanta, Georgia to Homer and Faye Williams. Both of his parents were teachers. Williams graduated from Douglass High School and developed an interest in raido and journalism. He eventually made his own carrier current radio station. He also began spending time at the radio stations WIGO and WAOK where he befriended a number of the annoucing crew and began dabbling in becoming a pop music producer and manager.

Williams was first a suspect in the Atlanta Child Murders in May of 1981 when a police surveillance team watching a bridge spanning the Chattahoochee River (where several bodies had been dumped previously) heard a loud splash which suggested someone had thrown something large over the bridge into the water. The first vehicle to leave the bridge after the splash was Williams’. When he was stopped by the police he told them that he was on his way to a neighboring town to audition a young singer named Cheryl Johnson for his music business but the number he gave police was fictional, along with Cheryl Johnson.

On May 24th, the nude body of Nathaniel Cater, a 27-year-old who had been missing for three days, was discovered by the river. He had died of possible asphyxiation. It was never clear if he had been strangled or not. Police had a theory that Williams had killed Cater and that him throwing the body over the bridge was the loud splash they heard. Williams was brought in for questioning and took three polygraph tests which he failed. Hair and fibers were taken from another victim and were consistent with his home, car, and dog. A coworker told police that they had seen Williams with scratches on his face and arms at around the time of the murders which police believe was caused by the victims during a struggle.

There began a several week long investigation where Williams taunted the police officers staking out his parents’ home with insults and jokes. During a press conference that Williams held outside his home he proclaimed his innocence, and told the press that he failed his three polygraphs, which was inadmissible in court. On June 21st, 1981, Williams was arrested for the murders of Cater and 29-year-old Jimmy Ray Payne.

Williams’ trial began on January 6th, 1982 in Fulton County. During the two month trial, prosecutors matched nineteen sources of fibers from his home and car to a number of victims. Other evidence included eyewitness testimony placing Williams with several victims while they were alive, which showed inconsistencies in his account of his whereabouts. Williams took the stand in his own defense, but alienated the jury by becoming angry. After just twelve hours of deliberation the jury found him guilty on February 27th of the murders of Cater and Payne. He was sentenced to life imprisonment. In the late 1990s he filed a habeas corpus petition and requested a retrial. The Butts County Superior Court Judge Hal Craig denied his appeal. In early 2004 he sought retrial again. In the 146 page federal court filing, his attorneys argued that there should be a retrial because law enforcement officers were covering up evidence of involvement by the Ku Klux Klam and that the carpet fibers linking him to the crimes would not stand up to scientific scrunity. A federal judge rejected it once more.

Edmund Kemper

FeaturedEdmund Kemper

In honor of the recent Netflix show, “Mindhunter” I’ve decided to dedicate this post to the Edmund Kemper. He’s incredibly fascinating in how meticulous he was when he started his killing spree in how much thought and how he evaded capture for so long.

Edmund Emil Kemper III was born in Burbank, California on December 18th, 1948 to Clarnell Elizabeth Kemper and Edmund Emil Kemper II. He was the only son and middle child, having an older sister (Susan) and younger sister (Allyn). His father was a WWII veteran who tested nuclear weapons in the Pacific Proving Grounds after the war, then moved back to California after that and worked as an electrician.

His mother wasn’t a happy woman. She complained constantly about her husband’s “menial” job, and at some point his father has been known to say: “suicide missions in wartime and the later atomic bomb testing were nothing compared to living with Clarnell.”

Kemper was a large boy even from birth. He was 13 lbs as a newborn baby and by the age of 4 he was a head taller than all of his peers. He was extremely intelligent, but showed antisocial and psychopathic behavior, such as cruelty to animals. When he was 10, he buried a cat alive. When it died he dug it up, decapitated it, and then mounted the head on a spike (in an interview later in his life he admitted that he got pleasure from lying to his family about who actually killed the cat). Another incident with a cat happened when he was 13 and he killed a cat that he thought favored his sister Allyn over him. He kept the pieces of this cat in his closet until his mother found them.

Considering what he did with cats, it comes as no surprise that he had a dark fantasy life. He would perform rites with his younger sister’s dolls that involved removing their heads and hands. He would also play games called “Gas Chamber” and “Electric Chair” where he would get his younger sister to tie him up and flip an imaginary switch and then he would fall to the floor and pretending he was dying.

On one occasion his older sister Susan teased him and asked why he didn’t try to kiss his teacher and he replied with, “If I kiss her, I’d have to kill her first.” As a little boy he would sneak out with his father’s bayonet and go to his second grade teacher’s house to watch her through her window.

He’s had two near death experiences, both caused by his sister Susan. The first one he was almost hit by a train when she push him in front of one and the other one was she pushed him into the deep end of a pool and he almost drowned.

He had a very close relationship with his father and was devastated by his parents divorce in 1957. This caused him to be raised by his mother in Helena, Montana. He had an extremely dysfunctional relationship with her. She was a neurotic and domineering alcoholic who would often belittle, humiliate, and verbally abuse him. She often mocked him for his large body size (he was about 6 feet 4 inches tall by the age of 15) and called him a “real weirdo”. She refused to coddle him in fear of “turning him gay”, and told him that he reminded her of his father and that no woman would ever love him. Kemper would later describe his mother as “a sick angry woman” and thought she was suffering from borderline personality disorder.

At the age of 14 he ran away to see his father who he found out was remarried and had a stepson. He stayed with his father for a while before being sent off to live with his paternal grandparents, Maude and Edmund Kemper, who lived on a ranch in the mountains in North Fork, California. He hated living there, referring to his grandfather as senile and projected his hatred of his mother onto his grandmother who he felt was similar to her.

On August 27th, 1964 Kemper’s grandmother got into an argument with him sitting at the kitchen table, so he stormed off and got his .22 caliber rifle that his grandfather gave to him for hunting. He returned to the kitchen with it and shot his grandmother in the head and twice in her back. He then dragged her body into her bedroom and waited for his grandfather to come home. When he did, Kemper went out into the driveway and shot and killed his grandfather as well. He didn’t know what to do after the crime so he called his mother who in turn told him to call the police. He did so and waited for them to come take him into custody.

When he was questioned by authorities he said he “just wanted to see what it felt like to kill Grandma” and the reason he killed his grandfather as well was so he wouldn’t have to find his wife dead. His crime was seen as incomprehensible for a 15 year old to commit and the court psychiatrists diagnosed him as suffering from paranoid schizophrenia and sent him to the criminally insane unit in the Atascadero State Hospital. At the hospital, psychiatrists and social workers strongly disagreed with Kemper’s diagnosis. They said there was no evidence of hallucinations and no evidence of bizarre thinking. He had a high IQ (136) and he was re-diagnosed as having a “personality trait disturbance, passive-aggressive type”. Before he was released his IQ went up to 145. Kemper was a model inmate, and was trained to administer psychiatric tests to other inmates. He was a good worker and not seen as a typical sociopath. He was released to the care of his mother on his 21st birthday and had his record wiped clean.

While he was in the care of his mother he attended community college and hoped he could become a state trooper. He ultimately was rejected due to his size. At this time he was around 6 feet and 9 inches tall which gave him the nickname “Big Ed”. Although rejected as a state trooper, he still kept in contact with the Santa Cruz police and would occasionally have drinks with them in the Jury Room, which was a bar.

He started dating a 16 year old Turlock High School girl that he would later be engaged to. That same year he was hit by a car while riding on his motorcycle and sued the driver. He bought a new car with his settlement money from the accident and noticed a lot of women who were hitchhiking. That’s when he started storing tools in the back of his car. He started picking up women as a way to practice being able to convince them to get into his car. He kept doing this until he finally gave into his homicidal urges.

Between 1972 and 1973 Kemper went on a terrifying killing spree. He started with two college students and ended the spree with killing his mother and her best friend. He would pick up hitchhikers and take them to isolated areas where he would them proceed to shoot, stab, smother or strangle them, then he would perform irrumatio on their severed heads, have sex with their corpses and then dissect and dismember them. He went on to do this for 11 months. When he killed his mother his had sex with her severed head, cut out her vocal cords and tried to put them in the garbage disposal but they were ejected out. He said about that moment, “That seemed appropriate. As much as she’d bitched and screamed and yelled at me over so many years”.

Kemper was indicted on eight counts of first degree murder on May 7th, 1973. He was found legally sane to stand trial and while in custody he attempted suicide twice. He was finally sentenced on November 8th, 1973 and received 7 years to life for each count with these terms to be served concurrently. He is currently still in prison and seen as a model prisoner, and is in charge of scheduling other inmates’ appointments with psychiatrists and makes ceramic cups, he also reads books on tape for the blind.

The Keddie Murders

FeaturedThe Keddie Murders

The Keddie Murders was a 1981 quadruple homicide that happened in Keddie, California. It took place in Cabin 28 during either the late evening of April 11th, 1981 or early morning of the next day. The victims were 36-year-old Glenna Sue Sharp (who went by Sue), her 15-year-old son John, and his 17-year-old friend Dana Wingate. Later Tina Sharp (who was 12) was found a distance away from the cabin. Let’s break the crime down.

Sue and her five children (along with a few of her son’s friends) went to a cabin that Sue had been renting since November of 1980. On the night of April 11th Sue’s oldest daughter, Sheila, went to sleep over at a friend’s cabin instead of staying at her own. This move saved her life. A bedroom upstairs would have Sue’s youngest sons and their friend sleeping in it. The morning of April 12th, Sheila came back to her cabin at around 7:45 AM and discovered a grizzly sight. Her mother, her brother John, and his friend Dana were all murdered. They had been tied up with medical tape and appliance wire, and had been stabbed, bludgeoned, and strangled to death. Upstairs, Sheila discovered her two younger brothers and their friend were fast asleep, completely unharmed. With the help of her neighbors she got the three boys out.

An examination of the bodies revealed that the victims suffered from at least two different hammers of varying size. Sue and John had been stabbed repeatedly, and Sue had also been bludgeoned to death with a rifle and Dana Wingate was strangled to death. There were various weapons found at the scene, including a table knife, a butcher knife, and a bloody hammer (later another bloody hammer would be found that seemed to be intentionally planted). Other weapons, such as the rifle, were never recovered. A second bloody knife turned up in a trash bin behind the Keddie general store.

There were several suspects, including Marty Smartt, who was a close friend of the family’s and with the local sheriff (his son was also with the Sharp family and was the friend sleeping upstairs) and “Bo” Boubede, who was reportedly a hit man for Chicago and Las Vegas mobs. Some suspects were thought to be former lovers of Sue that held a grudge for some reason, but despite the considerable evidence and police questioning no one was arrested. It was questioned severely why Tina’s body was discovered so far from the cabin, and many people believe the entire crime was a police cover up. Eventually, in 2004, Cabin 28 was demolished along with the secrets and answers to this horrendous crime.

Jeffrey Dahmer

FeaturedJeffrey Dahmer

Jeffrey Lionel Dahmer was born on May 21st, 1960 at the Evangelical Deaconess Hospital in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. His mother, Joyce Annette worked as a teletype machine instructor and his father, Lionel Herbert Dahmer, was going to Marquette University to pursue a degree in chemistry. Dahmer was loved and cherished as a child by both his parents, but his mother was a very tense, greedy for attention, and argumentative woman with her husband and even the neighbors. When Dahmer started first grade his mother was in bed a lot due to recovering from weakness. His father’s studies kept him away from home and when he was home Joyce always demanded attention from him. Needless to say, Dahmer started getting less and less attention from a young age from his parents.

Dahmer was always considered an energetic and happy child until he went through a double hernia surgery right before he turned four. This left him quite subdued. When he was interviewed later he commented that his family life was very tense and his parents argued a lot with each other. During his time in elementary school many people noted he was quiet and timid. A teacher commented that Dahmer had a sense of neglect which seemed to be attributed to this mother’s constant illnesses. Even though Dahmer was quiet and timid as a child he did have a small group of friends.

Ever since Dahmer was a child he had a strange fascination with animals. Friends said that he would keep insects in little jars that he stored in his house, but later he would go and collect animal carcasses off the side of the road. He would dismember the animals at home or in the woods behind his house. He always said that he wanted to know how each animal fit together. At one time he was known to have impaled a dog’s head onto a stake behind his house. His fascination with dead animals might have started when he was four and he watched his father remove animal bones from beneath their home. According to Lionel, Dahmer was “oddly thrilled” by the sound of the bones and had developed a fixation on them and played with them. He would sometimes look under the house for bones and when he had his live animals he would explore their bodies and figure out where their bones were.

In October 1966 the Dahmer family moved to Doylestown, Ohio. During that time Joyce was pregnant with her second child. She gave birth to a baby boy on December 18th, 1966. Dahmer was given the opportunity to name the baby, which he calls David. That same year Lionel got his degree and started working as an analytical chemist in the city of Akron. Just two years later they moved to Bath, Ohio. Two years after their move during dinner one night Dahmer had asked his father what would happen to chicken bones if they were placed in bleach. At this point Lionel was worried about his son’s isolation and his lethargic attitude and thought Dahmer was having some sort of scientific curiosity and was happy to tell him. He showed his son how to safely bleach and preserve animal bones. Dahmer would later use this to bleach many more animal bones he collected.

During high school, especially his freshman year, Dahmer was seen as an outcast with only a few friends. He attended Revere High School and there were many testimonies as to how strange and concerning Dahmer’s behavior was in school. He was known to have drank liquor and beer, bringing it into school in flasks and such in his army fatigue jacket. He was always drinking before, during, or after school and it started when he was about 14 years of age. One time a classmate saw Dahmer drinking a cup of gin and asked him why he was drinking alcohol in class, in which Dahmer simply replied “it’s my medicine”. The staff on the other hand saw him as an intelligent and polite student. He had average grades, which many believed was due to this apathy, but he was known to be a good tennis player and played in the high school band.

When he reached puberty Dahmer realized he was homosexual. He never revealed to his parents of his sexual orientation even though he was in a brief relationship in his early teens. Later he admitted that he started sexually fantasize sexually about having complete control over a subservient partner. These thoughts eventually intertwined with thoughts of dissection. At about 16-years-old Dahmer had a rape fantasy of knocking unconscious a male jogger he found attractive and making sexual use of his body. He hid himself in a bush with a baseball bat and waited but the jogger did not go past that day. Dahmer never tried the plan again but he admits this was his first attempt to hurt someone.

Even though Dahmer was a loner in high school he was also seen as a goofball and a class clown. He would play pranks that some were to amuse his peers and some were for attention. Due to these pranks if anyone else pulled pranks it became known as “Doing a Dahmer” or “Pulling a Dahmer”. By 1977 his grades were failing because of his alcoholism and his apathy towards school and interacting with people. His parents hired a private tutor for him, but the tutor had limited access. That same year his parents were seeing a marriage counselor which was unsuccessful and they ultimately divorced. Although it started out as an okay situation they started bickering a lot in front of their sons and finally Lionel moved out in 1978. In May of 1978 Dahmer graduated school. A few weeks before his graduation one of his teachers saw him sitting in the school parking lot drinking beer. The teacher threatened to report him, but Dahmer said that he was dealing with a lot of problems and that the guidance counselor was very aware of his problems. A little bit after this Joyce was given custody of her younger son and left to move in with her family. Since Dahmer was 18 by this time the custodial considerations did not apply to him.

Now, after learning about Dahmer’s past, let’s get to his streak of murders. He committed his first murder in the summer of 1978 just three weeks after he graduated high school. He was living alone in the family home after his parents moved out. On June 18th he picked up an 18-year-old hitchhiker named Steven Hicks. He lured him to his house with the idea that they’d drink together and Steven accepted. After drinking and listen to music for several hours Steven wanted to go and Dahmer didn’t want him to. He hit him twice from behind with a 10 lb dumbbell and then strangled him with the bar of the dumbbell. He then stripped the clothes off of Hicks’ body and stood above the corpse, masturbating. The next day he dissected the body in his crawl space and later buried the remains in a shallow grave in his backyard. He later took the remains out and dissolved the flesh in acid before flushing the solution down the toilet and crushing the bones with a sledgehammer and scattering them in the woods.

About six weeks after the murder his father and his fiancee returned to the house where they discovered Dahmer was living alone. That August he enrolled at Ohio State University and hoped to major in business. As soon as Dahmer got to college however he was incredibly unproductive, mainly because of his alcoholism. Lionel on one occasion visited Dahmer and found his room completely littered in empty liquor bottles. Even though Lionel paid for Dahmer’s second term of college he dropped out just after a few months.

In January of 1979 due to his father urging him to, Dahmer enlisted in the United States Army. He trained as a medical specialist at Fort Sam Houston before July 13th, 1979 when he was moved to Baumholder, West Germany where he was a combat medic. According to reports he was an average or a slight average soldier. Two soldiers accused Dahmer of rape while in the army. One said while stationed at Baumholder Dahmer raped him over a 17 month period while the other soldier says he believed he was drugged and then raped by Dahmer inside an armored personnel carrier in 1979. Due to Dahmer’s severe alcohol abuse his performance in the army deteriorated and so in March of 1981 he was deemed unsuitable for military service and discharged (honorably). On March 24th, 1981 he was sent to Fort Jackson for debriefing and was given a plane ticket to travel anywhere in the country. Dahmer felt like he couldn’t face his father so he went to Miami Beach, Florida as a way to live on his own. He got a job and was staying at a nearby motel, but because of his alcoholism he spent most of his salary on alcohol and was eventually kicked out of the motel for not paying. He spent his evenings on the beach while working at his job until he called his father and asked to return home.

Once he returned home he spent some time living with his father and his stepmother, but he kept on drinking heavily and was eventually arrested for being drunk and disorderly. He was fined $60 and spent ten days in jail. Lionel tried hard to get Dahmer off drinking, but was unsuccessful. Eventually they sent him to go live with his grandmother (who was the only person he ever showed affection towards) who lived in West Allis. He occasionally drank there but mostly was weaned off it. He eventually found a job as a phlebotomist at the Milwaukee Blood Plasma Center, but he held the job for only ten months before being fired. He was then unemployed for two years, living off of whatever money his grandmother gave him. Shortly before losing his job, Dahmer was again arrested, this time for indecent exposure. He had exposed himself in from of twenty-five women and children on August 7th, 1982.

He picked up a job at the Milwaukee Ambrosia Chocolate Factory, where a man gave him a note offering to give him oral sex. Dahmer did not respond, but this did start to stir the sexual fantasies he had when he was a teenager. He started going to gay bars and bathhouses to find men that would follow his fantasies. By late 1985, he started going frequently to the bathhouses, but during his sexual encounters there he was getting frustrated with how his partners would move during the acts. He saw them more as objects instead of people. Because of his way of seeing people as objects instead of people, he began drugging his partners by slipping sedatives into their liquor. He then would commit sexual acts on their unconscious bodies. After about twelve of these incidents he was kicked out of the bathhouses, but he still used hotel rooms to continue these practices. A little bit after he was kicked out of the bathhouses, he saw in the newspaper that an upcoming funeral for an 18-year-old was to be held. He thought about digging up the body and bringing it home, but when he attempted the act, he claims the ground was too solid and he gave up on the idea.

In August 1986, Dahmer was arrested again for masturbating in front of two 12-year-olds, and he did admit to it but later claimed he was simply urinating and was charged with disorderly conduct and so on March 10th, 1987 he was sentenced to a year’s probation with additional instructions to see a counselor. After this period is when his killing spree really began.

In November 1987 Dahmer, who was still living with his grandmother, met a 25-year-old from Michigan named Steven Tuomi at a bar and managed to persuade him to return to the Ambassador Hotel where Dahmer had rented a room. According to Dahmer, he did not intend to kill Tuomi, but he did intend to drug and rape him. However, when he awoke the next morning Tuomi was laying under him with his chest crushed and black and blue with bruises. Blood was leaking out of the corner of his mouth and Dahmer’s fists and forearm were bruised as well. He said he didn’t remember what happened or that he had killed him. He then later said he couldn’t believe it happened. To get rid of the body, Dahmer purchased a large suitcase and moved the body to his grandmother’s house. One week later he cut off the head, arms, and legs and placed the flesh inside garbage bags. he wrapped the bones in a sheet and pounded them into spinters with a sledgehammer. This whole process took Dahmer about two hours to do and all of Tuomi’s remains except his head were disposed of into the trash. Two weeks following Tuomi’s murder, Dahmer kept the head in a blanket and he later boiled the head in a mixture of Soilex and bleach in an attempt to keep the skull to use as a stimulus for masturbation. Eventually the skull was too brittle by this process and was destroyed as well.

After he killed Tuomi, Dahmer went on to actively seek victims. He encountered most of them at gay bars and enticed them to his grandmother’s house where he would drug and kill them after engaging in sexual activity with them. His method of killing was strangulation. Two months after Tuomi, he encountered a 14-year-old Native American prostitute named James Doxtator. Dahmer again lured him to this home this time with the promise of $50 to pose for nude photos. After they engaged in sexual activity Dahmer drugged him and then strangled him in the cellar. He left the body there for a week before taking it apart. He did the same thing to Doxtator as he did with Tuomi. On March 24th, 1988 he killed another man, 22-year-old Richard Guerrero which after he killed him he performed oral sex on the corpse. On April 23rd, he lured another man to his house, but after drugging his coffee his grandmother called to him and so he could not kill him and took him to the hospital instead.

In September 1988, Dahmer’s grandmother asked him to move out because she did not like him always bringing men over and complained of foul smells coming form the basement and the garage. Dahmer found a one bedroom apartment and moved in on September 25th. The following day he was arrested for drugging and sexually fondling a 13-year-old boy and then in January of 1989 he was convicted of second degree sexual assault and of enticing a child for immoral purposes. The sentencing for the assault was suspended until May. On March 20th, Dahmer commenced a ten day absence from work and moved back in with his grandmother. Two months after his conviction and two months before his sentencing he murdered his fifth victim. He was a 24-year-old aspiring model named Anthony Sears and they met at a gay bar on March 25th, 1989. According to Dahmer, he wasn’t looking to commit a crime that night, but right before he left Sears started up a conversation with him. He took him back to his grandmother’s house and they both engaged in oral sex before Dahmer drugged and killed him, placing his body into the bathtub while taking apart the body. He admitted he found Sears “exceptionally attractive” and he was the first victim that he permanently kept. He preserved his head and genitalia in acetone and kept them in his work locker. When he moved the following year, he brought the remains with him. On May 23rd, 1989 Dahmer was sentenced to probation for five years and one year in the House of Correction. He got a work release form so he could keep his job and was required to register as a sex offender.

Two months before his scheduled release from work camp he was paroled. Dahmer moved back temporarily in with his grandmother again. He then moved into the Oxford Apartments in May 1990. Within a week of moving he killed again. His sixth victim, Raymond Smith. He then attempted to murder another man, but accidentally ingested the laced drink himself and when he awoke he had been robbed. He then killed three more people. After the last victim, he did not kill for five months. He was unsuccessful in luring more men into his apartment, and often complained to his probation officer about feeling anxiety and depression along with suicidal thoughts all relating to his sexuality, solitary lifestyles and financial difficulties.

The killings continued in 1991. In February, he killed a 17-year-old boy named Curtis Straughter, who he drilled a hole in his skull and poured hydrochloric acid into it, hoping to make essentially a zombie that would not resist his advances. By 1991, other residents in the apartment were complaining strange smells and sounds of a chainsaw coming from Dahmer’s space. He claimed the smells were that his freezer broke so food was being spoiled. On May 26th, 1991 Dahmer met 14-year-old Konerak Sinthasomphone, who was the younger brother of the boy he molested back in ‘88. He ended up escaping the next day and was found by three women who called the police. Dahmer convinced the police that he was a lover of his and took him back to the apartment. He then killed him and along with the already decomposing body of another victim in his bedroom, he left them both and went to a bar to drink and went and bought more alcohol. He then took the day off on the 28th to spend the whole day dismembering the bodies. He went on to kill four more men before the last one managed to escape and report Dahmer.

His last attempted victim was Tracy Edwards. He was offered $100 to accompany Dahmer, and when they entered the apartment he smelled a foul odor. There were several boxes of hydrochloric acid on the poor, but Dahmer claimed they were used for cleaning bricks. He handcuffed Edwards and brought him into the bedroom to pose for nude photos. He then brandished a knife and told Edwards to strip which he complied but told him that he needed to take the handcuffs off to do so. Dahmer agreed and focused on the tv that was playing. Edwards observed Dahmer rocking back and forth and chanting. Eventually turning around and listening to his heartbeat and said he was going to eat his heart. Edwards said he needed to go to the bathroom and convinced Dahmer he wasn’t going to run away. He said he wanted to go in the living room and drink some beer with him and Dahmer complied. Edwards waited until Dahmer seemed to lapse in concentration and punched him in the face and ran out the front door. He flagged down police who followed him to the apartment and there is where they found the pictures of the dismembered bodies and even found a severed head in the freezer still. Dahmer, while on the floor with an officer on top of him said, “For what I did I should be dead”. The police found four severed heads, seven skulls, two human hearts, and even more body parts in Dahmer’s apartment. A total of 74 pictures were gathered.

Dahmer’s interview hours totaled over 60 hours and he admitted to killing 16 young men, including Steven Hicks in Ohio. He also confessed to being in the process of making an altar, believing he could draw a sense of power from his victims. He pleaded guilty but insane to 15 counts of murder on January 13th, 1992. He was diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder, Schizotypal Personality Disorder, Necrophilia, alcohol dependency, and a psychotic disorder. He was not given the insanity sentence, and was sentenced to life imprisonment plus 70 years. He was extradited to Ohio and was tried for the murder of Steven Hicks. He pled guilty and was sentenced to a 16th term of life imprisonment on May 1st, 1992.

While in prison Dahmer was kept in solitary confinement due to concerns of his safety should he come into contact with other inmates. He became a born-again Christian and was baptized. In July 1994, a fellow inmate, Osvaldo Durruthy, attempted to slash Dahmer’s throat with a razor imbedded in a toothbrush. He suffered superficial wounds but was not seriously injured. Dahmer was reportedly ready for death and didn’t care what happened to him. Finally, on November 28th, 1994, Dahmer was beaten in bathrooms by Christopher Scarver. He was taken to the hospital, but was pronounced dead an hour later. Many people were pleased with his death, but of course his mother was outraged. His body was cremated and his ashes divided between his parents.

Lizzie Borden

FeaturedLizzie Borden

“Lizzie Borden took an axe

And gave her mother forty whacks.

When she saw what she had done,

She gave her father forty-one.”

That famous rhyme has been heard all throughout history since the incredibly vicious murder of Lizzie Borden’s parents in their own home in 1892. Lizzie was acquitted of the murders although many people still believe she committed the crime. In the end no one was actually charged for the murders, but even now people are debating who the real killer is.

Lizzie Andrew Borden was born July 19th, 1860 in Fall River, Massachusetts to Andrew and Sarah Borden. Her father was a successful property developer and he directed several textile mills including the Globe Yarn Mill Company. He also owned some commercial property and was both the president of the Union Savings Bank and a director of the Durfee Safe Deposit and Trust Company. Despite his success and wealth, Andrew was quite a frugal man. His home did not have indoor plumbing and did not spend money as those who were extremely rich did. Her mother eventually died in 1863 and three years later Andrew married Abby Durfee Gray.

Lizzie had an older sister named Emma and they both were raised religiously and attended the Central Congregational Church. Lizzie was extremely involved in her church which also included teaching Sunday school to children of recent immigrants, she was involved in Christian organizations such as the Christian Endeavor Society where she was a secretary-treasurer, and also social movements such as the Women’s Christian Temperance Union. She was also a member of the Ladies’ Fruit and Flower Mission. She very much detested her stepmother and would often called her “Mrs. Borden” which indicated she did not feel close with Abby at all. Lizzie was convinced Abby was just after her father’s money and didn’t actually love him.

A lot of tension grew in the family months before the murder especially due to Andrew giving Abby’s family members various pieces of real estate. Lizzie and Emma demanded that they got a home as well and so they got the home they lived in before their mother died. They purchased it for $1 but a few weeks before the murders they sold it back to their father for $5,000 (which is like $133,000 today).

On August 4th, 1892 between 10:30 AM and 11:10 AM Andrew Borden was murdered in his living room while taking a nap while Abby Borden was killed between 9:00 AM and 10:30 AM in the guest bedroom. Lizzie and Emma usually cleaned the guest rooms but at the time John Morse, the brother of Lizzie’s deceased mother, was staying with them and had slept in so when he awoke Abby went up to make the bed. According to forensic investigation it seemed that Abby was facing her killer which she was first struck from the cut above her ear which caused her to turn and fall to the floor. She was then struck 17 more times in the back of the head until she finally was dead.

Andrew and Morse were in the sitting room after breakfast and chatted for about an hour. Morse left to visit a relative at around 8:48 AM and Andrew left for his morning walk around 9 AM. When he returned it was around 10:30 AM and his key failed to open the door so he knocked on the door for help. Bridget, the maid, tried to unlock the door but it was jammed. Later she claimed she heard Lizzie laughing from what seemed to be from the top of the stairs. This statement was significant since Abby was thought to be murdered first and was found upstairs in the guest bedroom. Lizzie of course denied it. Lizzie also gave two different accounts of her movements on that day. She said she was in the loft for about 20-30 minutes eating pears and that she went to look for an iron in the loft as well. Bridget Sullivan, the maid, said she was in her room on the third floor resting from cleaning windows when at around 11:10 AM she heard Lizzie calling to her from downstairs. She said someone had come in and killed her father. He had been struck around 10 or 11 times with a hatchet. One of his eyeballs had been split in two which suggested he was asleep when he was attacked. He was still bleeding which meant it was a very recent attack.

During the investigation, Lizzie was giving strange and contradictory answers to the police. At first she claimed she heard a groan or a scraping noise before entering the house, but two hours later said she heard nothing and didn’t think anything was wrong when she got inside. When she was asked where her stepmother was she said that Abby received a note saying she should visit a sick friend. She also said she thought Abby had returned and asked someone to go upstairs to check. Mrs. Churchill (a neighbor) and Bridget went upstairs and as they reached the halfway point they saw in the guest bedroom Abby lying facedown on the floor.

Many of the investigators did not like Lizzie because of how calm she was and that she kept changing her story about her whereabouts. However, no one checked her for bloodstains or properly searched her room. They found several axes in the basement one of which the handle was broke and was thought to be the murder weapon but at the time didn’t do much about it. A friend of the family, Alice Russell, entered the kitchen the day after the murders and witnessed Lizzie ripping up a dress saying she got paint on it and was going to burn it and it was never tested if there was blood on it nor was it confirmed whether or not it was the dress she wore the day of the murders.

Lizzie was initally tried and then aquitted based on not enough evidence and also the poor work of the police at the time but she remains still a suspect of the murders even to this day. Her behavior, the dress, and her accounts of her actions on her day still do not make sense but many people believe she was the one who murdered her parents in cold blood.